Chandragiri Fort, Chittoor District
Travel

Chandragiri : A Small Fort With A Rich History

Chandragiri is a village in the Chittoor district of Andhra Pradesh with quite a rich history. It is home to a small fort originally built in the year 1000 AD, by the Yadavaraya rulers who ruled these parts for about 3 centuries. In the 14th century, the fort became a part of the Vijayanagara empire which had its capital in Hampi. In the 16th century, an alliance of Deccan Sultanates defeated the Vijayanagara army in the Battle of Talikota, and killed its ruler Aliya Rama Raya. They then proceeded to plunder and destroy Hampi to ruins. The slain king’s brother survived the battle, and he moved to Penukonda in present day Andhra Pradesh. From there, he ruled the now weakened and diminished kingdom. The last Vijayanagara king made Chandragiri his capital, but the empire disintegrated after his death. Next, Chandragiri passed into the hands of the Golconda Sultanate and finally the Kingdom of Mysore.
The Chandragiri Fort with a granite hillock behind it

This granite hillock forms the backdrop of the Chandragiri Fort

Now the fort – you enter it through two gateways, with carved pillars typical of Vijayanagara architecture. There are two parts in the innermost enclosure – a lower fort and an upper fort. The upper fort was closed to public when we went – I’m not sure if it’s always like that. A granite hill forms the backdrop to the lower fort, which has two important buildings. The first is the King’s Palace, a three storeyed palace with a durbar hall in the middle. Apparently, the greatest Vijayanagara ruler, Krishnadevaraya, lived here until he ascended the throne. If you’ve been to Hampi, you’ll notice the resemblance this building has to the Lotus Palace there. The ASI runs a museum in the King’s Palace now. The other building is the Queen’s Palace, which is smaller, but similar in design. It is believed to date back to the reign of Krishnadevaraya’s successor.
Chandragiri Fort, Chittoor District

The King’s Palace, Chandragiri Fort

The Queen's Palace, Chandragiri Fort

The Queen’s Palace, Chandragiri Fort

There is a reservoir at the base of the hillock, which would collect rain water flowing down the slope, making the fort self-sufficient for its water needs. The moat around the fort was filled by rain water as well.

Chandragiri Fort, Chittoor District

The gate that leads to the innermost part of the fort

The ornate pillars on the inner gate

The ornate pillars on the inner gate

Chandragiri Fort, Chittoor District

Details on the inner gate

Chandragiri Fort, Chittoor District

Details on the inner gate

Chandragiri Fort, Chittoor District

The very ornate entrance gateway in the second fortification

Details in the entrance gateway

Details in the entrance gateway

Chandragiri Fort, Chittoor District

Ornate Vijayanagara style pillars

Chandragiri Fort, Chittoor District

Details in the entrance gateway

Chandragiri is about 145km from Chennai, and 230km from Bangalore, but I really wouldn’t recommend going all the way – for all its rich history, the fort itself is not too remarkable. But if you are in the vicinity, like in Tirupati, which is just 14km away, do check it out. A sound and light show happens at the fort every night, with narration by Amitabh Bachchan. I didn’t watch it, but since the history of Chandragiri is rich, I’m guessing it must be good. Please note that the fort is closed on Fridays.
 
And finally, another interesting bit of trivia about Chandragiri: in the 17th century, the British East India Company purchased from Chandragiri’s king’s general, the piece of land where they built Fort St. George. The regions around the fort grew into present day Chennai, known as Madras earlier. You might have heard of the Madras Day celebrations that now take place each year – they are held on the anniversary of that historic transaction.

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3 Comments

  • Reply km gupta July 17, 2016 at 6:57 PM

    There is another route to Tirumala from Chandragiri..

  • Reply Chitra Ganesan March 3, 2016 at 8:19 PM

    That was a lovely read Madhu. Brought back lovely memories of my history classes when we learnt about the Vijayanagara dynasty. Good pictures!

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